Tag Archives: kansas

Interview with Jenny of Wichita Woolery

I’m excited today to bring you a fantastic interview with Jenny Brown, the artist behind Wichita Woolery.  I’ve been drooling over her gorgeous creations on her facebook page for some time, and she recently opened an Etsy shop where she offers hand dyed roving and handspun yarn for sale.  Check out the interview, then visit Jenny’s shop–you’ll be glad you did! 

M&R: How long have you been spinning and dyeing?
Jenny:  I started down the rabbit hole of spinning about five years ago after graduating with my Master’s degree.  I didn’t have a job lined up after graduation, and to be honest, wasn’t sure I wanted something in the industry that I just obtained my degree in.  I was already halfway through my program when I realized this, but toughed it out and just earned my degree anyway.  Knitting was always my comfort and self-care while in grad school, and I think it was then that I realized my true passion was the fiber arts.

I don’t recall how, but I came across a spinning class at City Arts. I really wanted to take it, but it was over $100 for the class, which was a lot of money for me to spend at the time. It just felt too self-indulgent to spend that kind of money especially when it could have been used for something else. My husband encouraged me to sign up for it though, and I’m SO glad he did! The class wasn’t offered for another few years because the instructor’s daughter had a baby, and she left Wichita to help take care of her new grandchild. It was during my classes at City Arts, where I was first introduced to dyeing. We had dyed fiber with Kool-Aid, and I loved the idea of being able to create any color yarn I wanted. Eventually, I started to dabble with dyeing at home for myself, and then more seriously dyeing for others in the last year and a half. 

What drew you to working with fiber?I think what continues to draw me to fiber and the needle arts in general, is the freedom to create whatever you want. I’m a Type A personality and like structure in nearly every other aspect of my life, but fiber and the needle arts has the capacity for me to be both structured and flexible in creating. It’s the perfect combination!

 

How did you learn your skills?
Growing up, there wasn’t anyone in my family who did anything related to fiber or the needle arts. One of my childhood best friends cross-stitched (she learned from her mother), and I remember thinking that it was so cool. I just loved how you could get a finished piece from the mosaic of multi-colored X’s. I begged her to teach me when I was in middle school, and it was my gateway drug into the needle arts. At 18, I taught myself to knit, which branched off into wanting to learn to spin, and spinning into dyeing, and the journey continues. 

What is the most satisfying part of working with wool (or other fibers)?
For me, the most satisfying thing of working with fiber is creating something from the source. Other than owning my own sheep and processing the fiber (maybe I will some day), I’m creating something from a raw state. I think in spinning there are two groups: process spinners and project spinners. I myself identify as a process spinner, meaning that I don’t spin my yarn with a project in mind, I just enjoy the process of creating yarn. It’s so satisfying starting with a blank slate,creating a color scheme for my roving, and making yarn, which the yarn can then be taken and made into a finished handmade item. Ever since I started spinning, it’s all I want to do in my free time when I’m not dyeing.

What are some of its challenges?
One of the biggest challenges of dyeing I’ve come to discover, is the learning curve. A lot of successful dyers out there aren’t really forthcoming with sharing their skillset with others, which saddens me. We all have something we could contribute to this industry, and rather than having a collective of like-minded individuals sharing passions, dyers hoard their skill set for their sole personal gain. It’s something I don’t really quite understand. Nevertheless, just figuring out my own working methods of dyeing from watching You Tube and reading the few books on dyeing that are out there has been a process.  One of the other challenges that I’ve had now that my Etsy store is open, is the same problem that every other shop on Etsy has… How does my shop get exposure? I’m at the point where I’d like to branch out a little bit and begin making fiber festival rounds to gain more exposure. Stay tuned on that…

Where do you find inspiration for your color combinations?
My inspiration comes from a variety of sources. I love looking at nature photos, which really is the best source if I feel blocked. My husband also helps me come up with colorways. He’s an artist himself, and has lots of color theory experience.  One of his favorite things to do is create pallets, and we’ll bounce ideas of each other. I also love looking at other artist’s work, including other fiber artists and indie dyers.

How do you hope your work will impact or influence others?
One of my hopes is that I can teach and inspire the next generation of fiber artists to continue on with this tradition that dates back thousands of years. I love sharing my knowledge and teaching others who are interested in the fiber arts, especially younger kids because I didn’t have anyone at that age who could have taught me. If I had, who knows where I would be now had I discovered my passion that early on.

Are you involved in any other types of craft?
Although 99.9% of my craft time is consumed by the fiber arts, I’m also interested in learning more about the crafty side of homesteading. Canning, raising chickens, making soap, candles, artisan breads and cheeses all sound like a lot of fun. Maybe one day I learn the skills for all of that, but for now I’m focused on what fulfills me the most, which is literally anything fiber. I feel like I still have yet to discover the end of the fiber rabbit hole.

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Thanks again to Jenny for sharing her time and insights with me and all of you.  It’s always a joy to connect with other creatives and learn from them!

Interview with Laura from The Corner of Knit and Tea

Laura is an Overland Park artisan who creates fabulous things from fiber and has them available for purchase at her online shop, The Corner of Knit & Tea.  She spins, knits, and–yes–loves tea!  (She’ll even add some of her favorite teas to your Etsy order!)  When her vibrant, oh-so-squishy-looking yarns first caught my eye, I knew I had to learn more about them, not to mention the maker behind them.  Laura has been gracious enough to take the time to share her creative story with me, and I am now honored to share it here with you…  

M&R: How long have you been spinning yarn?
Laura:  My grandmother, who was a Renaissance artist of sorts (painter, sculptor, illustrator, knitter and weaver that I know of), taught me how to knit when I was 6 or 7 years old. I loved going to visit her, getting to pick something out from her basement full of craft supplies, and sitting next to her on the couch as the cast the yarn on the needles for me to start another scarf.

While I continued to knit on and off throughout the years, I really got back into the craft in my 20’s when I was living in Los Angeles. I came across a lovely yarn and fiber store on my way home from work one night, and I started going to their informal knit nights, taking classes and learning new techniques. I had sort of felt stymied in learning more about the craft once my grandmother had passed away, but now I could keep learning.

The advent of Ravelry was really a turning point for me. All of a sudden there was a site where I could communicate with and learn from members of the fiber community all over the world. It was a kind Raveler who sent me my first braid of fiber and recommended that I purchase the book Respect the Spindle by Abby Franquemont to learn how to spin. This was the Spring of 2010.

​How did you learn to spin?
All through the Spring and Summer of 2010 I practiced on the spindle, learning to spin thinner and thinner and more consistently. At this point I was living in the Kansas City Metro Area and very close to the Harveyville Project, which hosts an event called Yarn School a couple of times a year. The owner, Nikol Lohr, is also an authorized dealer of spinning wheels. I was able to rent a wheel from her in the Fall of 2010 and teach myself how to spin on it. I purchased my first wheel, an Ashford Joy, for Christmas in 2010. I took a few spinning classes at a local yarn store (Yarn Barn in Lawrence), and then went back to attend Yarn School in the spring of 2012 and I was on my way!

How did you become interested in spinning?
I don’t know exactly what it was that drew me to spinning originally, other than the fact that it was a something new to learn and I’m always eager to learn more about the craft. Once I started however, I loved it.  

​Do you have a favorite fiber?
I really love choosing my materials. I tend to gravitate away from natural, unprocessed fibers. While I enjoy knowing where my fiber comes from I prefer to purchase fiber that has already been cleaned, combed/processed and dyed. I am always drawn to bright, intense colors – jewel tones are my favorite – and I really like variegated braids full of lots of colors. I find that these braids are the most interesting when spun up. A lot of people strive to make their spinning “as good as” commercial yarn; that is thin, even and looking quite uniform. I actually prefer my yarn to look handspun. That is, I want it to be a one of a kind item that looks handcrafted. I love a variety of colors in my fiber because those braids lend themselves to a barberpoled look. I tend to choose fiber that is well prepared, and I mostly stick to the softer fibers because I find that most people want fiber that is next to the skin soft for their projects. I do find some uses for slightly more rustic, sturdy fibers. For instance, while my favorite fibers to spin are Falkland, Polwarth and Targhee for their softness and bounce, I really think Corriedale makes an excellent yarn for sturdy socks.  

​What do you find most satisfying about your craft?
I also really love the process of spinning. For starters, no matter what the fiber looks like before I start spinning, I really can’t predict exactly how it will look spun up. That’s part of the fun – each skein is sort of an unexpected surprise. But in terms of the actual spinning of the fiber, I find the process very meditative and calming. There are enough things to think about to keep it from becoming boring – how fast should I treadle, how quickly should I draft the fiber through my fingers, how quickly do I want one color to flow into the next. But once I have made some of those decisions there’s a rhythm to it that I really enjoy. 

​What are some of the challenges?
The only challenges of my craft that I have found are that there is never enough time to accomplish everything I want to do and that, thus far, I haven’t found a way to make my creative life a career. These are both highly intertwined. Spinning yarn is a time intensive process. Each braid that I list in my shop takes between 5 and 8 hours to create. I try to price my handspun skeins of yarn competitively, but by the time I account for the cost of materials, what I earn for my time wouldn’t be a living wage. While I could certainly learn a more productive way to spin, or I could raise the prices of my yarn, I don’t know that there would be enough hours in the day or enough demand at higher prices to really allow me to sell handspun yarn for a living. So for now, I continue to have a day job, and pursue all my creative endeavors “after hours.” This means that even though I spend several hours of my free time each day knitting and spinning, there’s never enough time to make as much as I would like!

Where do you find inspiration for creativity?
I think I’m primarily inspired by visuals. What I mean is that I’m inspired by other people’s projects, by photographs that people translate into dyeing fiber or yarn. Again I really credit Ravelry and other social media (like Instagram) for so much inspiration because it allows creators all over the world to share what they are doing, particularly with visual images.

How do you hope your work will influence or impact others?
I hope that my work inspires people to learn the crafts that I enjoy (knitting and spinning), or to find ways to creatively express themselves, whatever form that might take. I also hope that I can give someone the experience of knitting with my handspun to create their own one of a kind item.

Be sure to visit Laura’s Etsy shop, The Corner of Knit & Tea, and check out her scrumptious yarn.  Laura’s blog and video podcast can be found at thecornerofknitandtea.com.  And of course, you can find her on Ravelry! 

Shop Small, Kansas.

Welcome to volume 2 of my holiday gift guide!  This time, the focus is on small, locally owned brick and mortar shops.  These are must-visit destinations, especially on Small Business Saturday.

Nectar Republic (formerly known as Milk + Honey Candles) has a brand new place in Clifton Square, and I can’t wait to visit them!  They handcraft natural soy candles and bath goods, and their shop carries these along with home decor and vintage accent items.  3700 E Douglas Ave., Ste. 40, Wichita, KS.

   

The White Peacock Tea and Coffee Company in Lindsborg is definitely a place to check out!  Naturally, you’ll find delicious and organic fair trade refreshments, but they also carry fabulous handmade art, accessories, and more. 124 S Main St., Lindsborg, KS (785) 212-6108


white-peacock

Lucinda’s is–I think it goes without saying–a Wichita favorite!  They carry all sorts of stylish, fun, wonderful clothing, accessories, jewelry, gifts, and more.  Also a large variety of locally handmade items.  There’s something for everyone here!  Located at 329 N Mead St. in Wichita (next to the Old Town Warren).

Right across the way from Lucinda’s is Bella Luz, which specializes in handcrafted gifts, many of which are made by local artisans. 300 N Mead St., Ste. 105, Wichita, KS.

bellaluz

The Workroom is a sewing workroom for home textiles, and also an amazing retail space for local artists.  Home decor, art, pottery, Wichita Flag swag, and more…swing by sometime, and be sure to follow their facebook page, as they are always posting great events. 150 N Cleveland St., Wichita, KS

Naughty Tiger Gifts in Mulvane is another hidden gem.  This chic and cheerful store is chock full of unique gifts and handmade goodies, home goods, accessories and more.  They are big proponents of offering fair trade and American made items, and a good deal of their profit goes to their family animal rescue farm near Leon, KS.  You can find the shop at 213 W Main St., Mulvane, KS.

Karg Art Glass, owned by artist Rollin Karg, sells quality art pieces of–yes–glass!  There are some pretty spectacular pieces found at this gallery, in a range of prices.  Be sure to follow their facebook page as well, as they often have holiday events–including blowing your own glass ornament!  You can visit them at 111 N Oliver St., Kechi, KS.

Watermark Books & Cafe is such a cozy, lovely book store and coffee shop…do I really need to say more?!  Shop there, then follow them for events and more. 4701 E Douglas, Wichita, KS.

 

FarmShop LLC is a garden center focusing on community and sustainable, organic, locally grown food.  They specialize in landscape and gardening solutions, and are yet another purveyor of locally made goods! 1136 Bitting Ave., Wichita, KS.

Hatman Jack’s is truly a part of local history and has outfitted some stars…but most importantly, they really just have a great selection of hats.  (I think hats need to make a comeback.)  Give your loved ones or yourself the gift of style!  Find them in Historic Delano at 610 W Douglas Ave, Wichita, KS.

 

 

 

 

 

 

What’s your favorite local business?

Interview with Mike Moen of Old Church Works

I am very excited about today’s post because I am finally getting to explore some fabulous, local artisans and share them with you!

Today, my guest is Mike Moen, the talent behind Old Church Works based in Andover, KS, which offers bespoke leather crafted goods.  Not only is his work beautiful and quality-crafted, but he has some great insights into design and why we create.  Let’s jump right into the interview!

How long have you been crafting leather goods?
Mike: I’ve been leather crafting about about 4 years. It has been a fun learning process. Learning the technical process is only part of it. It’s also about learning to acquire a taste for what works functionally and looks great.

How did you become interested in this art?
I consider myself a notebook nerd. Something about the analog nature of pen or pencil to paper is quite soothing. To me it’s the ultimate creative tool set – whether one is a writer, doodler, painter, drawer, sculptor or entrepreneur.

From there I found natural undyed leather covers were a perfect companion to my affinity for notebooks. The worn crinkly paper was very much akin to the scarring and patina of leather. These items become ever-changing. I found I get more attached to them the more they change and yet I can’t wait to fill a note book to start another!

So I am a fan of every day carry leather goods first. Back in 2012 I bough my first piece and I was disappointed. So out of necessity I made my own. The only tool I had was an Xacto Knife, but I got the job done. I was please with what I made. I made one for my Field Notes and one for my Moleskine.  

How did you learn?
I learned mostly, armed with my own taste, by trial and error. I have an entire cabinet filled with epic fails. Once in awhile someone will catch a glimpse of my leather works graveyard and say, “Hey that’s cool! Can I buy that!” And I’ll think, maybe that wasn’t such a fail. Ha!


What do you find most satisfying about your craft?

I find coming up with something new and original is very satisfying. Of course, in reality there is no such thing, but I’m not building stuff from a book or a kit. Every Old Church Works product starts with my design, my measurements, my idea. What’s better than that?

I really like clean and simple designs. I think it can be very difficult to create something simple that works. I always try to remove the superfluous in my designs. I think that gives my stuff it’s staying power. Complexity in familiar, everyday items wears people down. Consumers are quick to discard complexity.


ocwWhere do you find inspiration for creativity?
Early on I found myself spending at least an hour every day scrolling through Instagram. I was so inspired with the community of creatives out there. I really, really admire artists and creatives. It’s such a brave thing. I had to just jump in and do it too! And look what happened?! I am one!

How do you hope your work will influence or impact others?
It’s weird for me to think that I sit around my studio and listen to music and draw, cut and sew and from that I have actual fans! People love my stuff! Loyal customers are very humbling. Because I am a fan of my own work first, I want everyone who opens that Old Church Work package for the first time to have an experience. To me buyer remorse is such a sad thing. I want them to feel awesome about their purchase. Anyone who buys something online is aware of that risk. I think about that very thing from the time I cut that first piece of leather until the stamp is put on the package. “They’re are just going to LOVE this!” I say that to myself the entire time.

 I want to thank Mike again for taking the time to discuss his work.  Do you know of any local artists who deserve to be featured?  Let me know!  Until next time…stay creative!

Autumn in Kansas: Bohemian Finds

How can we possibly be into October already?!

The grand opening of the shop (and subsequent giveaway!) is coming up soon, but in the meantime, I’ve got some work to do.  So this week’s post is all about inspiration.

Autumn is such a romantic time: perfect for sunset walks among the changing leaves, accompanied by a rising full moon whilst wearing long, flowing skirts, the scent of campfire smoke and incense on the crisp breeze…or something like that.

Sad news:  My intention today was to create an Etsy treasury, but much to my dismay, as of today, treasuries will no longer be a feature.  (Really, Etsy?!)  Good news: I can still spotlight artists’ work and am also reminded that it’s almost always going to take a grassroots effort to promote handmade.  (Sneak peek: next week’s post we’ll explore Generation Handmade.)

These finds are special–not just because they’re beautiful and autumny, but because each of these items is crafted by a Kansas artisan.  Enjoy, follow the links below, and remember to always support local!

treasury1

  1. yarn by http://thestashbuckler.etsy.com
    2. http://www.etsy.com/listing/159212397/sleep-forever-skull-sleep-mask
    3. hair accessores by http://plainsrevival.etsy.com
    4. http://www.etsy.com/listing/238684284/double-field-notes-arts-sciences-leather
    5. http://www.etsy.com/listing/90952290/woodgrain-heart-necklace-custom-initial
    6. http://www.etsy.com/listing/276751222/roving-merino-silk-top-fiber-velvet
    7. http://www.etsy.com/listing/246360671/sterling-and-onyx-teardrop-pendant-black
    8. http://www.etsy.com/listing/292306099/pink-yellow-floral-rose-bear-ears
    9. http://www.etsy.com/listing/468465896/argentium-silver-with-carnelian-earrings
    10. http://www.etsy.com/listing/230063241/josephine-hand-body-lotion-jasmine
    11. http://www.etsy.com/listing/150758499/oracle-exotic-fig-spices-and-musk

I want to mention, The Soiled Dove lotion (#10) and Madame Scodioli’s solid perfume (#11) are both exquisite and absolutely heavenly.  (The Soiled Dove is a sister company to Scodioli.) I cannot praise their body products too highly!!

In the spirit of Fall inspiration, I must also share my Pinterest feed from this morning…could it be any more lovely?!  (If you’d like to see who I’m following and check out my pins, you can see my profile at pinterest.com/sweetlee)

fall-pinterest

What’s inspiring you today?  Please share!