Tag Archives: Books

Zine Love

God willing, 2018 will be the year of more ART.

Often times, I am torn between my desire to create and my desire to sit on my backside and stare at books (…or the internet…a lot of times, the internet, if I’m being honest…)

Anyway.  I mean to work on that.  I want to paint and just make more cool stuff.  If you know me, you know I have an obsession with zines.  I’ve only made a couple myself.  But there is something so indescribably attractive to me about these little books.  Maybe it’s all the possibility for freedom and expression in these often minuscule volumes.  Who knows.

A fabulous box of books…

As I’m scanning online sources (ironic, eh?!) for inspiration, I’m coming across some interesting-looking zines and other handmade books.  What about you?  Have you ever created one, or would you like to?  Do you have a favorite zine?

Filmage: A 35mm Photo Zine
Double zine pack with extras
Sketchbook by Molly Egan
Matchbox zine by Caelli Jo Brooker
A map of leaves
Zine Mermaids by Nina Schindlinger
Sketchbook by Molly Egan
How to Knit
Poetry zine

Is #moreart on your list of goals for 2018?  I’d love to see what you’ve been working on!

Book Review: The Lost Art of Dress

 Recently, I finished reading The Lost Art of Dress: The Women Who Once Made America Stylish by Linda Przybyszewski; I first learned about the book on Thread Cult (a favorite podcast about sewing and fashion.)  Being a fan of both fashion and history, the topic itself was tempting enough.  I found, though, that beyond simply providing a historical account of fashion, this book offers up a lot of food for thought on the way society has changed over time.

The book begins by introducing Mary Brooks Picken, one of the first “Dress Doctors,” or women who were designers, teachers, and writers, educating others on how to dress well, and even getting the government involved via the Bureau of Home Economics.

The Dress Doctors looked to the Five Principles of Art–harmony rhythm, balance, proportion, and emphasis–to advise women in their dress.  (Part of the reason vintage fashions are still so appealing is because they adhere to these very effective principles.)  The book discusses the “duties” and occasions of dress, offers lots of interesting facts and anecdotes, and finally looks at the decline of the Dress Doctors  (hint: it had a lot to do with the 1960s.)

What I enjoyed most about this book, though, was that it provided a bit of a window into the mindset of women of the past–a time when being sophisticated (read: over 30) was actually something young girls looked forward to, a time when people didn’t have the compulsion to tell every stranger they met about every detail of their life, a time when certain colors or articles of dress had a significant meaning.

You may not care to follow all the Dress Doctors’ rules for dress, but you may be inspired to take a cue from their outlook on living.  To them, fashion wasn’t just superficial, but ultimately held a connection to deeper things.  I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in history, art, fashion, or sociology.