Craftacular Vendor Application: POSTED!

Are you a maker in the Wichita area (or beyond?) who wants to be part of the 2018 Craftacular Handmade Market?  Then get excited, because registration is now open!

This Craft Show is exactly that: a shopping experience full of wonderful, handmade goods.  No resale items or MLMs.  The vendors not merely salespeople; they are representing their own work.  They take their time, talent, and hands to create soulful items that are beautiful and unique.  (If you’re reading this, you probably already understand why handmade is so important.)  But that’s why I am so proud to be able to organize this show.

You can view the Craftacular page here, which is where the downloadable pdf application can be found.  Please don’t hesitate to get in touch with me if you have any questions about anything!  You can email me here.

Totes Totes: Free Market Bag Tutorials & Patterns

Farmer’s Market season is nearly upon us!  This is something I just realized the other day…I also realized that I’ve been really bad about remembering to bring my totes to the grocery store.  Market totes are the kind of thing you can’t have too many of….(especially when you’re forgetful.)

I thought this might be a good time to offer a tutorial on totes, but I’ve got so many unfinished projects going on right now that I figured it may be better to simply share some of the great free tutorials that are already out there!  Check out these free patterns and instructions and make some today…

Folding Grocery Tote instructions by Yarn Geek:

(Adorable!) Paws and All Cat Tote Sewing Pattern by Orange Betty

Fold-Up Market Tote how-to by Purl Soho:

Also by Purl Soho, The Twenty Minute Tote tutorial:

Reversible tote how-to by Skip to my Lou:

And I nearly forgot this little illustration I made years ago…see it here.

This is also a lovely pattern for those who crochet; the French Market Bag Pattern by Two of Wands:

And for the knitters…the Eastern Market Tote Pattern by Tanis Gray

Do you have a favorite tote or favorite pattern?  What features do you like or need when bagging up your goods?

Easter Basket Finds

Winter seemed to drag on, but now that we’re into March, I can hardly believe it…and Easter is less than a month away!  If you’re searching for something extra special for your Easter baskets, check out this list of lovely and unique handmade treats!

Salty & Sweet Tee by Stay Cozy Tees, $18
Marfa agate necklace by Cultivated Dreams, $100

All of the felted wool sculptures by this artist are just amazing and adorable….be sure to check out the entire shop!

Spring onion by WooolSculpture, $40

CraftSanity (TM) Pocket Tapestry Loom by CraftSanity, $12

Yes, I know I shared Art Farm in the last gift guide, but her stuff is just too lovely!!  (Full disclosure: and yes, she also happens to be my mom…)
Rose of Ireland Cross by Art Farm, $14

Anise Cookie Dyed Yarn by Beach Bum Yarn, $21
Detachable collar by YukiKana, $20

And I really want one of these…!

Pardon the Weeds aluminum sign by Timmerman Prints, $20
OOAK bunny art doll by NatashaArtDolls, $80.10
Hand Knit Teapot Cozy by Anders Farm, $18

And last but certainly not least, a print that I adore from Oklahoma artist, Heather Sleightholm:

Our Lady, Undoer of Knots art print by SleightholmFolk, $18

Luscious Velvet and Updates…

Happy Saturday!  I figured it was about time I give an update on what’s been going on around here.  I am working on adding new items to the shop, and these are a few new creations currently available…

I just love this dusty rose/mauve velvet–it makes a great handwarmer.  It is so silky smooth and lustrous.

This pouch was handwoven by me, from silk and wool yarns.  The wool yarns (cream and beige colored) were actually handspun by me as well.  The back is made from a caramel linen, and the lining is a fabulous, mustard-colored organic cotton…

Handspun Handwoven Zipper Pouch

This necklace includes reclaimed bits of Kuchi chain, beads and other baubles.  The felted wool is from a knitting swatch.

textile found object mixed media necklace

Though I plan to continue to stitch, March will be bringing on some serious arting vibes!!  The Clearwater Art Walk, an event I’ve participated in for a couple of years now, is coming up on April 6 and I hope to have lots of new work by then.  (There might be another art show, too, depending if I am able to get ready for it…details to come if I decide on it…)

Garden season is nearly upon us, too!  Well, it should be already…there are seeds I’ve wanted to start, but haven’t, of course.

I’ve also started working on what I’m calling Anatomy of a Pouch…I’m not yet sure if it will be a series of posts, an ebook, or what yet….but basically, it’s designed to help YOU sew and design your own zipper pouches.  I would hope to have this done sometime in March, but no promises!

As always, I would love to know what crafty things you’re up to!  Feel free to share here or on any of my social pages, or shoot me an email!

Living the Homestead Dream: An Interview with Quinn of Reformation Acres

Today, I am beyond thrilled to be able to bring you an interview with Quinn of Reformation Acres!  I’ve been following her blog and facebook page for sometime, and it is such an inspiration.  She is a homesteader, blogger, and also crafts all-natural skincare items.   Quinn has been gracious enough to take the time to share some of her insights with me, and I am excited to pass them on to you.  If you are interested in the homesteading life, read on…


Moth & Rust: Tell me about your name, Reformation Acres; is there a story behind that?
Quinn: The name Reformation Acres was born of a purpose more than from a story.  Whether it’s our lives or our land, we want to always be reforming. We want to evaluate not only ourselves but our farm practices, to continually be making improvements. We want to steward, heal, nourish, and regenerate the land… leaving it better than we found it. The healthier our land is, the healthier our food and herbs will be, and the healthier and more productive we will be!
M&R:  How long have you been involved with gardening/homesteading?
Q:  It’s hard to believe it has been that long, but we’ve started our first garden 2006 and pretty much started building a homestead from there on. The “gateway livestock”, chickens, came the next year, pigs the year after, and then a family cow the following year.  What can I say? We were hooked.

Every year has its challenges and I’m always impressed by how much I still have to learn. We designed our first herb garden around that chicken coop and it sparked a fire within me to constantly be building my knowledge of herbs, particularly the health benefits found in medicinal herbs, flowers, and roots. With a family of 10 I’m given plenty of opportunity to discover new ways to use herbs to improve our health and well-being!
M&R:  What motivate or inspires you to pursue and continue homestead life?
Q:  When you grow and raise your own food, it has 3 secret ingredients that can’t be found in any other food on the planet. Your own blood, sweat, and tears. Those 3 secret ingredients make every single thing you eat taste better! I don’t understand how that magical process happens, but it’s totally true! That’s motivation enough alone!But it is indescribably satisfying to have such a close connection with the earth and your family, all working together to put food on the table. We want our children to learn where their food comes from and understand what goes into their food, the sacrifices that are made so they can eat. Even if they don’t do the work themselves one day, I want them to appreciate the ones who are! We want them live balanced lives and hopefully create a good work ethic that will serve them the rest of their lives.

Also, we’ve come to realize that, in most facets of the homestead, we couldn’t afford not to homestead. To buy meat and milk raised with the care we give our animals, and vegetables grown as naturally as we grow ours would be devastating to our budget.

Reformation Acres’ Super Scrub Gardener’s Soap

M&R:  How did you become involved with making soaps and balms?  How did you learn the process?
Q:  When I had babies, I started reading labels on everything. I stumbled across The Environmental Working Group (EWG) and their Skin Deep Database. It really made me think about everything we were exposing our bodies to through our largest organ, our skin. I learned that most soaps you’ll find in the store aren’t really soaps, but are synthetic detergents. I wanted better for myself and my family. I learned from seasoned soap makers how to make real, cold-processed soap. I was nervous at first, but it didn’t take long before I was hooked! It is so much fun discovering new ways to incorporate the things we were making on our farm into our soaps! I’m always brainstorming new ideas and combinations. The only downside is my soap-making can often be limited by the seasons. We moved to a new and larger farm a few months ago and we’re planning to grow a larger volume of botanicals and herbs that can be preserved for off-season use.

Dandelion Salve

M&R:  Can you tell me about the ingredients you use?
Q:  We use only natural ingredients in all of our products. No artificial fragrances, no synthetic dyes in anything we make! Whenever possible, we incorporate local ingredients in our products, preferably those from right off our farm. Whether that’s milk from our Jersey cow, Holly,  jewelweed growing down by the creek, produce from the garden, or comfrey under the apple tree. Those herbs and flowers that we don’t have on our farm but use in our products, we are in the process of getting established to the point where we can sustainably harvest.We have chosen to be 100% palm-free. This is so important to us! Palm oil is one of the most common, versatile oils you’ll find in handmade soaps. It’s also one of the largest contributors to deforestation and habitat loss for native species where the trees are grown. Instead, the base oil used in most our soaps is local purified tallow made from the suet of cattle grazing the hillsides in Amish country, Holmes County Ohio. Instead of being thrown out, we are able to take what would end up as waste,  saponify and redeem it to make the most creamy & bubbly, moisturizing & nourishing soap for your skin!


Reformation Acres’ Burn Salve

M&R:  Which products are your favorites and why?
Q:  Oh my goodness! This is such a tough question because I love them all (or I wouldn’t dare sell them!) Right now, it’s the dead of winter and my dry skin is so thankful for my Calendula Butter Hand Salve. But when I burn myself in the kitchen, my favorite product is Burn Salve. It instantly soothes the burn. When my face breaks out, I grab a bar of Tomato Soap and it’s cleared up in days. In the summer, when we start getting bug bites and poison ivy, I’m reaching for the Jewelweed Salve to bring relief from all the scratching. But I’m a lover of simple things and my favorite soap, after all my creations, is still Cream

Anti-Itch Jewelweed Salve

Line. It’s such a great bar of soap! I love everything about it- the fresh scent, the lather, how extraordinarily well it cleans without drying out my skin, and especially how long it lasts compared to other handmade soaps I’ve used!

M&R:  How do you hope your products and blog will influence others?
Q:  You know what would be truly awesome? I would love hearing a story one day about someone who used our herbal, farm-based products and it sparked a connection with the land. They were drawn to experience it in a closer, more real and tangible way. Perhaps then a visit to our website would encourage them to take that first step. Not to look at the obstacles that might be in their way, but to get their hands dirty (literally) and learn the satisfaction of being a producer. Is that too much to wish for?  I sure hope not!

M&R:  How has your community (online or offline) impacted your homestead journey?
Q:  I have the most amazing community building me up and encouraging me! I am so humbled every day by the love and support I get! Early on in our homestead journey, I realized how dependent we become on God. Through the influences of nature, we only have so much control. The rest is up to Him. Some years He provides and other years He doesn’t, but we find it’s always balanced in another area of production. It makes you realize what a misnomer “self-sufficiency” really is.

But as we continue on our journey, we realize we are even less self-sufficient than we at first thought. Though we know more now than we have before, we are just as dependent on our community for encouragement, support, wisdom, and often-times the hands to make it all possible!

M&R:  Does homestead life ever become overwhelming?  How do you recharge and keep things balanced?
Q:  Does it ever! And I’ve learned that the feeling of overwhelm ebbs and flows with the seasons so on one level I know that it will get better soon. But I’ve also learned that I don’t have to “do it all.” We have chosen to do the things that best suit our families needs and passions and focused on them instead of being rockstar homesteaders.  Still I struggle with getting overwhelmed. I used to push through and run myself ragged, but I now know that  in the end it will only burn me out. I’ve really had to force myself to take care of me too! When I find myself stressing, I head to the woods and pray! (Or spend a little extra time brushing and talking to my cows.) Being creative helps keep me balanced and my passion for soap making allows me to be creative and productive at the same time!

M&R:  What advice would you give to someone who wants to become more self-sufficient but believes they don’t have the enough resources?
Q:  Learn something. Don’t make excuses. It really, truly doesn’t matter where you live. You can build skills. And the things you learn to do with your own two hands, no one can ever take that away from you!  And in those skills you’ll find empowerment! It’s the little things, the baby steps you take that create a more self-sufficient lifestyle. Look around and find one thing in your kitchen you could make yourself instead of buying and learn how to make it! There is large and powerful network of people on the internet eager to help you take that first step!

+ + +
I am, again, so grateful to Quinn for taking the time to do this interview with me.  Please be sure to visit the Reformation Acres website for insightful articles, how-to posts, resources, and more; and be sure to stop by the Reformation Acres Etsy shop to check out her amazing products.  

Favorite Fabrics: The Feedsack Dress

There is something so appealing to me about the feedsack dress.  Though sometimes viewed as a symbol of the necessary frugality (or, poverty,) of the Depression era, it was also a way to “[give] rural women a sense of fashion.”  I’d love to see this type of practical reuse come back (though granted, less people are living in rural settings and don’t usually find themselves purchasing large bags of feed…)

I know “the good old days” were not always a fairy tale, but you have to admit this aspect of past times is pretty dreamy.  And aside from the upcycling aspect, the prints were so fun and cheerful!

Yellow tiered feedsack dress from Dreem Co, $165
’30s feedsack dress from Vintage Clothing and Co, $114.99
1940s Dress from Carla and Carla, $145

When searching for examples, I even found this children’s play costume of Cleopatra!

Vintage feedsack from Maudelynn, $98

Of course, these colorful fabrics were also utilized for crafting quilts and other items that were useful around the house…

Yo-yo Twin Size Quilt from Upswing Vintage, $225
Floral Feedsack Apron from Hatfeathers Vintage, $32.49

Craftsy has a lovely post about feedsack quilting that talks a bit more about feedsack fabric, which you can read here.

Valentine’s Finds

Are you still looking for that perfect gift for your sweetheart(s)?  If you’re like me, you probably are, because you like to wait until the last possible minute.  ;)   Check out these fabulous finds now!

Mint and rose soap by Rouge and Rye, $8
Unicorn necklace by Moon Garden Designs, $26
Bunny Pouch by Orange Apollo, $12.74


Tiny Bird by Art Farm, $6
Leather keychain by Tenerina Bags, $15.37
Hematite Star Earrings by Beees Beads, $10
Heart ornament by the handmaid, $10
Dress Pattern PDF by Very Shannon, $9.95
Handwoven cowl by These Isles, $174.14
Floral arrangement by The Plaid Prairie, $28
Mini Max doll by Duke and June, $28

You Can Art: Opinions from a Non-Expert (Mini Zine!)

One of my goals for this year is to try and create a zine each month…or at least, every other month…(I mean, let’s not get carried away!)  But I’m happy to say that so far, I’m on track.  This month’s zine features some mixed media/collage work and my thoughts on creating art.  It measures 2.75″ x 4.25″ and is 16 pages (not including covers).  This is a very limited edition zine, with only 12 available, in three cover style choices.  You can purchase it over at the Etsy shop.

Tribal Stripe Coasters (Free Knitting Pattern!)

{Originally published September 2012 on Prairiesque}

I published this free pattern long ago on my old blog, and thought it was time to post again…this is a simple yet fabulous stitch pattern, (if I do say so!)   Like zipper pouches and coffee mugs, you just can’t have too many coasters.  Make these in some bright colors for a fresh & breezy feel, or maybe try them in a lovely subdued wool for something a little more hygge…

Tribal Stripes Linen Stich Coasters


  • 2 Balls (each a different color) of Sugar’n Cream yarn (or any worsted weight cotton)
  • US 5  (3.75 mm) straight needles
  • tapestry needle

CO = Cast on
st(s) = stitch(es)
MC = main color
CC = contrasting color
k = knit
p = purl
sl = slip stitch


Using MC, CO 20 sts.

Row 1: k1, bring yarn to the front, sl 1, bring yarn to back, repeat.
Row 2:  p1, bring yarn to the back, sl 1, bring yarn to front, repeat.
Row 3:  k1, bring yarn to the front, sl 1, bring yarn to back, repeat.
Row 4:  p1, bring yarn to the back, sl 1, bring yarn to front, repeat.

*Attach CC.  Using CC, repeat rows 1 and 2 once.

Using MC, repeat rows  1, 2, 3, and 4 once.

Repeat from * four times.  Bind off loosely, weave in ends.  Enjoy!


Scrapper’s Delight

As you may know, I often offer curated scrap kits over at my Etsy shop, because after 15 years or so of sewing, I have accumulated a whole lotta scrap.  If I am unable to use them (or am just tired of looking at a particular fabric!) I sell them because I know there’s someone out there who will give them the love they deserve.  Also…it’s the responsible thing to do!  The EPA estimates that the average American trashes about 70-80 pounds of textiles a year.   (YIKES.)  That is an absurd amount of waste that can be easily prevented by wise purchasing, careful use, and reclaiming/recycling.

Needless to say, I am so excited when I see other scrap kits popping up on the web!  Recently, the non-profit FABSCRAP in New York City launched their online store featuring mixes of fabrics recovered from high end designers, which you can visit here.

Also, the London-based artist Flextiles, who specializes in indigo shibori and ecoprints is now offering kits in her shop, which you can see here.

Really, you can find a wide variety of scrap bundles available on Etsy with a quick search.

One of my goals for this year is to put together a little inspiration booklet of projects that would work well for the scraps of all sizes…we’ll see when that gets done!

But in the meantime, as I was doing a bit of searching, I stumbled upon this fantastic directory of Scrapstores, as they’re called here.  Is there one near you?  Click here to check it out!

Mermaid’s Tale Scrap Kit from Moth & Rust
Unicorn Parade Scrap Kit from Moth & Rust

Craft is Back…

[Featured photo: gorgeous entomology/taxidermy work by Jennifer Blundon]

I am so very excited to announce that after a two year hiatus, Craftacular will be coming back in September 2018!

Craftacular is a little show I started back in 2012; we did it once a year, usually in the fall.  There was no show in 2016 or 2017 due to so much going on those years (well, truthfully, 2017 was more about taking a break from being previously overwhelmed…)  However, this September, it’s happening again and I am thrilled.

There are still a lot of details to be decided, but the time, date, and location are set.

It’s a privilege that means so much to me, to be able to organize such an event; from the beginning, the show has been about craft and art: making, dreaming, connecting.  I am so grateful to each person who has participated in the show and hope to see lots of  familiar faces, and new ones, on September 29.

As more details fall into place, I’ll be posting on the Craftacular facebook page.  I’ll also post the vendor application to this site as soon as it’s available.  (If you think you might be interested in being a vendor, let me know and I’ll email it to you directly as soon as I can!)

Breton / French Sailor Top! (Free Sewing Pattern.)

{This pattern was originally published July 2016 on my now defunct blog, Prairiesque.}

I’ve been wanting to make my own striped blouse/Breton top/French sailor shirt for a long time.   I had made the pattern, but it was surprisingly difficult to find just the right fabric.  I finally found a great fabric at Needle Nook Fabrics here in Wichita.  (One of my favorite shops, by the way.  Check them out!!)

sailor top fabric

This is my original pattern, which I’m offering for free–please use as you wish!   (If you plan to sell a finished product based on the pattern, it would be much appreciated if you would mention Moth & Rust as the source of your pattern. Thank you!)

This particular pattern only covers a small range of sizes; however, it is a fairly basic two-piece pattern, which can be easily adjusted at the sides and in the middle or hem.  Also, it may fit differently depending on how stretchy your knit fabric is.   The best thing to do is experiment with some comparable but inexpensive fabric before making the final piece!  Instructions are as follows:

  1.  Print all pages (in the gallery below) and piece together with tape, using the picture below and alignment bars as a guide.
  2. The front and back of the bodice are the same, except for the neckline.  Place on fold to cut.  The sleeve is also placed on the fold when cutting.
  3.  With right sides together, stitch at shoulders.  You can use a 1/2″ or 5/8″ seam allowance.  I would also suggest stitching some non-stretch lace or ribbon along the shoulder seems to keep them from stretching.
  4. Pin armhole side of sleeve to bodice armhole, right sides together, and stitch.   Make sure your stripes align, at least close to the armpit/bottom of the armhole.
  5. With right sides together, pin garment so that sleeve edges and side edges are together (again, aligning stripes) and stitch up sides.  Be especially careful when matching up the stripes on the bodice!!  I learned the hard way that stripes may be together, but if you don’t match the corresponding stripes, you will end up essentially with a spiral going around the body, which makes getting a straight hem impossible.
  6. Hem arm holes, bottom, and neckline. You may also want to use ribbon or a running stitch in your neckline to prevent stretching.



The chart here shows how the sections will print and how they are pieced together:breton pattern layout

To print the pattern pieces, click on each thumbnail below and print directly from that page, or save to your computer.


Handcrafted in Kansas